al-hayatAl-Hayat is one of the leading daily pan-Arab newspapers with an estimated circulation of over 200,000 copies. It is the newspaper of record for the Arab diaspora and the preferred platform for liberal intellectuals who wish to express themselves to a large audience.

BLAZE TO BRILLIANCE

FACTOIDS

A 2005 article in The New York Times described Al-Hayat as a “decidedly Arab nationalist paper”
Many columnists contributed to the op-ed pages of Al-Hayat ever since it has been relaunched in 1988
Al-Hayat is published from London, New York, Frankfurt, Dubai, Riyadh, Jeddah, Dammam, Beirut and Cairo
Though pro-Saudi with respect to articles concerning the Arabian peninsula, it is quite open to various opinions concerning other regional questions. Al-Hayat is published from London, New York, Frankfurt, Dubai, Riyadh, Jeddah, Dammam, Beirut and Cairo. The newspaper has offices in London, Paris, Washington, New York, Moscow, Riyadh, Jeddah, Beirut, Cairo, Baghdad, Dubai, Amman, and Damascus, among others.

FAITH FACTOR
A 2005 article in The New York Times described Al-Hayat as a “decidedly Arab nationalist paper”. The newspaper is distributed in most Arab countries, and most of its editors are from Lebanon, where Al-Hayat is very popular. The newspaper’s motto is “Life is belief and struggle”, a line taken from a poem by Ahmed Shawki.

ENGAGEMENT THAT ENTHRALS
Although Al Hayat is headquartered in London — the principal location for its editorial, administrative, distribution, and subscriptions offices — the paper also maintains offices in Paris, Washington, New York, Moscow, Riyadh, Jeddah, Dammam, Beirut, Cairo, Baghdad, and Damascus. The three offices in Saudi Arabia reflect the paper’s focus on the country as well as the regional division into central (Riyadh), west (Jeddah) and eastern (Dammam) editions.

INNOVEDGE
The international 24-page edition generally contains eight pages of political news (with marked differences from the front page focus of the Saudi edition). Other important sections include the features page, the opinion page, an extensive business section (four pages), a culture and arts page, and a sports section (two pages), in addition to other rotating sections on youth, as well as a miscellaneous section. On Sundays, the paper publishes a special supplement called Trends which publishes two additional pages of criticism and analysis from a variety of viewpoints.

BRAND PROMISE
Many columnists contributed to the op-ed pages of Al-Hayat ever since it has been re-launched in 1988. Among them are Hazem Saghieh, Abdulwahab Badraghan, Zouhair Koussaibati, Raghida Dargham, Randa Takieddine, Walid Choucair, Salim Nassar, political sociologist and writer Khalid al-Dakhil, and former editor of Saudi paper Al Watan, Jamal Khashogji. Among Saudi female columnists in the Saudi-Gulf edition are Dalia Gazaz, Badriyah Al- Bisher and Thuraia Al Shihri.